The following explanation of ADHD Coaching is on Wikipedia’s page for “Coaching” under a subheading “ADHD Coaching:”

“The concept of ADHD coaching was first introduced in 1994 by psychiatrists Edward M. Hallowell and John J. Ratey in their book Driven to Distraction.[7] ADHD coaching is a specialized type of life coaching that uses specific techniques designed to assist individuals with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. The goal of ADHD coaching is to mitigate the effects of executive function deficit, which is a typical impairment for people with ADHD.[8]

“Coaches work with clients to help them better manage time, organize, set goals and complete projects.[9] In addition to helping clients understand the impact ADHD has had on their lives, coaches can help clients develop “work-around” strategies to deal with specific challenges, and determine and use individual strengths. Coaches also help clients get a better grasp of what reasonable expectations are for them as individuals, since people with ADHD “brain wiring” often seem to need external mirrors for accurate self-awareness about their potential despite their impairment.[10]

“Unlike psychologists or psychotherapists, ADHD coaches do not provide any therapy or treatment: their focus is only on daily functioning and behaviour aspects of the disorder.[11] The ultimate goal of ADHD coaching is to help clients develop an “inner coach”, a set of self-regulation and reflective planning skills to deal with daily life challenges.[12]

“A 2010 study from Wayne State University evaluated the effectiveness of ADHD coaching on 110 students with ADHD. The research team concluded that the coaching “was highly effective in helping students improve executive functioning and related skills as measured by the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI).”[13] Yet, not every ADHD person needs a coach and not everyone can benefit from using a coach.[14]

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